The Secrets of Color – How Many Do You See?

Are You a Dich, Trich, Tetrachromat?

We’ve all heard of color blindness. Well, did you know that some people simply just see more color than others?

We know today that this phenomenon of heightened color awareness is directly related to color receptors or ‘cones’ in the eye. The simple secret is the more cones you have the more color you see.

Check out this article and see where you rank in the hierarchy of color chromatic consciousness!

Color – The Early Days

History tells us that for thousands of years humans have sought ways to make their garments and surroundings more aesthetically pleasing; more colorful.

Greek philosophers Democritus and Aristotle and Roman writers Pliny the Elder and Vitruvius recorded recipes to create fabric dyes from plants and animals.

Ancient Egyptians used color for ailments. There are lists on papyrus dating back to 1550 BC of color “cures”.

The Chinese also apparently practiced Color Healing. The Nei/ching, 2000 years old, records color diagnoses.

Color – In Science and Philosophy

Early studies about light were done by Aristotle. He discovered when a yellow and blue piece of glass was brought together a third color green was produced. He also discovered that light travels in waves.  Plato and Pythagoras also studied color and light.

During the Middle Ages, Paracelsus reintroduced the knowledge and philosophy of color using the power of the color rays for healing along with music and herbs.

Issac Newton was pioneer on the frontier of color. In 1672, he published his first, controversial paper on color, and forty years later, his work ‘Opticks‘. Newton observed when sunlight passed through a prism out the other end came seven different colors: Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet. This effect of white light spreading into rays he called ‘dispersion’ and named the different colored rays the color ‘spectrum’. Newton concluded that white light was made up of seven different colored rays.

Color – Today

Businesses are accepting that their employees may work better given a certain environment.

Hospitals are also becoming aware of the effect that the color around them can have on patients.

Paint companies have introduced new color cards with the therapeutic aspects of color in mind.

Cosmetic companies too have ‘colour therapy’ ranges included in their products.

Color which is all around us in nature has a great deal to offer and invites our continued exploration.

Wood Is Good – World’s Tallest Wooden Towers Proposed for Paris

As American Carpenters in Paris you learn quickly how little wood is used in construction and renovation here.

Bottom line; it’s just too expensive.

Much of Europe has been deforested many hundreds of years ago. In fact the first US patent was for potash or wood ashes used for fertilizer, which was sold to Britain and other European countries.

But lately, it seems as if wood has been getting a bad rap.

The focus on sustainable development never seems to include lumber as a material of choice; that is until now.

In the article, Towers Proposed For Paris Would Be The World’s Tallest Wooden Structures wood evangelist and architect Michael Green argues exactly the opposite.

He says because of new technological advances wood as a building material has become stronger, safer, and more economical than steel.

But Green goes even further, “Just as Gustave Eiffel shattered our conception of what was possible a century and a half ago, this project can push the envelope of wood innovation with France in the forefront.”

And with a name like ‘Green’ it’s kind of hard not listen.

Buckminster Fuller: the Dymaxion Bathroom & House

Dymaxion Bathroom

Buckminster Fuller was a 20th century inventor and visionary who did not limited to one field of expertise. He worked as a ‘comprehensive anticipatory design scientist’ to solve global problems. And one of the problems he chose to work on was the toilet.

He devised a four, stamped sheet metal or plastic commode that was light enough to be carried by two workers. They’ll fit up tight staircases and through narrow doors, allowing retrofitting in existing structures. All the appliances, pipes, and wires are built-in, limiting on-site construction to simple instillation hook-up.

With this configuration the interior has no germ-harboring nooks, crannies, or grout cracks.

This focus on sanitation was part of a larger effort known as the Dymaxion House which was meant to use a minimum of materials to provide maximum living space.

The Million Dollar Cave Man

From the Lascaux caves to the Palace of Versailles, France is home to some of the most unique and cherished one-of-a-kind dwellings in the world.  But for the past 25 years, Ra Paulette (sounds French) has been carving out man-made caves from the sandstone hills of New Mexico, USA. Driven by passion, not profit he sculpts these spaces into works of art he calls wilderness shrines. In one case he only charged a client 12 dollars and hour for his labor. Yet 2 of his caves along with the 200 acres around them are selling for close to a million dollars .

Vive l’amour!

 

From Snore to Sensational – Bring a Touch of Magic to Your Bathroom Shower

One can argue very few would find the above video interesting. Only the true construction aficionado would be captivated.

Enter the following article:

Heat sensitive shower tiles change colours as it warms up

Heat sensitive tile construction inspired by the Aurora Borealis. Now were talking!

 

DIY Garage Shelving

Don’t forget to Spring forward this Sunday, March 8th! It’s in that spirit with the longer days and the warmer weather that we enjoy new found energy to do lots of spring cleaning and to tackle long overdue organization projects. In this video Ana White shows us how to put together a DIY garage shelving unit that not only is simple but loads of fun to do. So grab your miter saw, screw gun, screws and 2x4s to spring forward with a tidy, organized, solid shelving solution that should take only a few hours to build.

Vacationing family decides to restore abandoned French chateau


They’ve unearthed mysterious medieval tunnels, uncovered ancient artifacts that hint to what daily life was like , and uncovered a beautiful fresco in a salon on the first floor. (Click here or on a photo for a slideshow.) It sounds romantic, but the process of buying and restoring a property of such size and significance has been an arduous labor of love.

Join this Australian family who had been on the hunt for a vacation home in France and then stumbled on a property in need of some major TLC that captured their hearts.

“We had never planned on a chateau. Our French friends warned us about those,” says Karina Waters,  “But after driving down the snow-capped mountains and seeing the chateau’s grounds from the village, we were sold.”

Click here to visit their website and see how things are going.